How to teach your child good hygiene habits
22-02-2016
It is crucial to teach your child good personal hygiene habits from an early age. Failure to do so might result in harmful allergies, diseases and even ridicule from other children at school. Teaching good hygiene habits at a young age can be a tricky affair so make your teaching lessons a bit fun. Here are a few simple tips.

Start with the basics
One of the most important hygiene practices you can teach your kids is hand washing. Make sure to teach them to wash their hands several times a day, especially after using bathrooms. Ensure that they use soap and water and scrub their hands properly. In order to encourage your kids to wash their hands for an appropriate amount of time, try having them sing ‘Happy Birthday’ while they wash.

Have fun
Learning about personal hygiene can be made fun. Turn blowing a nose into your best horn impression or use shampoo suds to turn their hair into a mohwak. They can even do a dance while brushing their teeth each morning.

Lead by example
In order to teach your child about personal hygiene you must lead by example. Let your child observe your own routine, let them see you brushing your teeth, combing your hair and washing your face at night. If they see you taking care of yourself they might do the same.

Talk to them about the importance of grooming
Sit down with your kids and explain to them the importance of personal hygiene. You can educate them on allergies, diseases and infections that could occur if they do not take care of themselves properly. There is a lot of educational material online that you could download and explain to your child.

Make it interactive
There are many great apps online that could help with teaching your child personal hygiene. i.e.: Pepi bath: this is an app that allows your child to choose a girl or boy character and role play. (Putting clothes in the machine, washing hands, shampooing hair etc.)

Make it a routine
Make sure your child incorporates combing their hair and brushing their teeth into their morning and evening rituals.

Ages
2 to 3
Calories
1,000-1,400, depending on growth and activity level
Protein
2-4 ounces
Fruits
1-1.5 cups
Vegetables
1-1.5 cups
Grains
3-5 ounces
Dairy
2-2.5 cups
Ages
4 to 8
Calories
1,200-2,000, depending on growth and activity level
Protein
3-5.5 ounces
Fruits
1-2 cups
Vegetables
1.5-2.5 cups
Grains
4-6 ounces
Dairy
2.5-3 cups
Ages
4 to 8
Calories
1,200-1,800, depending on growth and activity level
Protein
3-5 ounces
Fruits
1-1.5 cups
Vegetables
1.5-2.5 cups
Grains
4-6 ounces
Dairy
2.5-3 cups
Ages
9 to 13
Calories
1,600-2,600, depending on growth and activity level
Protein
5-6.5 ounces
Fruits
1.5-2 cups
Vegetables
2-3.5 cups
Grains
5-9 ounces
Dairy
3 cups
Ages
9 to 13
Calories
1,400-2,200, depending on growth and activity level
Protein
4-6 ounces
Fruits
1.5-2 cups
Vegetables
1.5-3 cups
Grains
5-7 ounces
Dairy
2.5-3 cups
Ages
14 to 18
Calories
2,000-3,200, depending on growth and activity level
Protein
5.5-7 ounces
Fruits
2-2.5 cups
Vegetables
2.5-4 cups
Grains
6-10 ounces
Dairy
3 cups
Ages
14 to 18
Calories
1,800-2,400, depending on growth and activity level
Protein
5-6.5 ounces
Fruits
1.5-2 cups
Vegetables
2.5-3 cups
Grains
6-8 ounces
Dairy
3 cups